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How to Reduce Inflammation Naturally

We’ve all heard the word inflammation before, but what does it really mean? What changes can we make to give ourselves the best chance to decrease our risk of disease? What foods do we eat to decrease inflammation?



We recognize inflammation within the body as redness, heat, swelling and pain. It is a natural healing response to bring nourishment and immunity to an injury or infection, but when the inflammation serves no purpose and refuses to go away, it causes illness.

How does that happen? 



Unnecessary inflammation is caused by the quality and types of foods you’re eating.  When we are inflamed our body cannot perform its functions properly - metabolize, detox, absorb nutrients and minerals, or stay hydrated. Your level of inflammation is indicated through the pH scale, which is a scale that ranges from 0 to 14. Anything below 7 is acidic (low on oxygen) and anything above 7 is considered alkaline. 

One of the biggest contributors to having an acidic pH is eating too much acidic food, causing your body to work like crazy to bring it back to an alkaline state. For optimal results  your diet should be within the range of 60-80% alkaline and 20-40% acidic.

The other downsides to acidity is our skin tends to be red, dry and inflamed, we feel sluggish, exercise yields no results, cravings are out of control, and we feel irritable. If any of these symptoms sound familiar, you can make small changes in your diet to get better rest, have more energy, and recover faster from intense exercise, surgery, and treatments. 



Best Foods for Alkalinity

almonds 

amaranth 

apples 

asparagus 

avocados 

bananas

 beans 

beets 

bell peppers 

blueberries 

brazil nuts 

broccoli 

buckwheat 

cantaloupe 

carrots 

cauliflower 

celery 

chlorella 

chocolate (dark, uncooked) 

coconut 

cucumbers 

extra virgin olive oil 

flax seed 

garlic 

ginger 

green tea 

hemp seed 

kelp 

leafy greens 

lemons

limes 

mangoes 

melons 

millet 

papayas 

peas 

pomegranates 

quinoa 

sesame seed 

sprouts 

strawberries 

sweet potato 

turmeric 

watercress 

white chia seed 

zucchini

Foods That Create Acidity

alcohol 

coffee 

dairy

eggs

fried foods

isolated soy protein 

isolated whey protein 

margarine 

poultry 

red meat 

refined grains 

roasted peanuts 

sugar-sweetened beverages

sugar 


None of this is about perfection, I believe that every little bit counts and there are varying degrees of what works for people from a holistic standpoint. The biggest thing you can do is apply the principle of crowding out by focusing on adding in as many anti-inflammatory foods as possible, which will naturally scales back the inflammatory foods.   About Sarah

Sarah Dade is a Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner through the American Association of Drugless Practitioners, and received her Certified Integrative Nutrition and Health Coach designation and training from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition (“IIN”) in 2012. Sarah is a Registered Yoga Teacher with Yoga Alliance and received her training from Yoga Vida NYC.


Sarah studies include holistic nutrition, preventive health, dietary theories, hormonal imbalances, supplement therapy, food psychology, one-on-one counseling, lifestyle management techniques, relationship coaching, asana yoga, and many spiritual practices from around the world.

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